Tag Archives: lingonberry

How to cook Lingonberry Ice Cream with a coffee maker.

We spent the weekend in our cabin. After a long day’s work in the sun Dan drove and bought ice creams. Yum!

coffee machine cuisine

I have cooked a couple of different ice creams in my coffee maker and the very best is of course the Lingonberry Ice Cream…

cooking with your coffee maker

Time

  • 6 hours

Ingredients

  • 2,5 dl cream
  • 2-3 egg yolks (the yolks I used was pretty small so I used 3)
  • 3/4 dl sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla sugar
  • 1-1,5 dl lingonberries
  • A couple of meringues
  • Basil leaves

Instructions

Start your coffee maker. Pour cream in the coffee maker carafe and heat it for almost an hour, it must get really warm. Give it a good whip every now and then, you know how easily cream burn.

Meanwhile mix eggs, sugar and vanilla together so it get’s fluffy. Pour the egg fluff with the warm cream in the carafe and put it back on the heater. Now this mixture shall coffee maker cook for a while until it thickens a bit, about 45 minutes. Don’t forget to stir. Turn off your coffee maker.

Before you add lingonberries and meringues let it cool for a while. Thereafter add lingonberries and meringues into the mixture and pour the ice-cream into forms. Place them in your freezer, stir every 30 minutes, until they get a nice ice-creamy consistency.

Eat and enjoy!

cooking with your coffee maker

The cream is cooking in the coffee maker can.

cooking with your coffee maker

This is how you cook lingonberry ice-cream with your coffee maker!

cooking with your coffee maker

Approved by Zappa.

cooking with your coffee maker

Chillin’.

cooking with your coffee maker

Didn’t find baby meringues, but this worked just fine.

cooking with your coffee maker

Can you see what’s standing next to the coffee maker made ice-cream? An ice-cream machine, ha!

cooking with your coffee maker

Eat it before it melts too much! (You probably won’t have that problem if you mustn’t wait for the photo shoot of the coffee maker made lingonberry ice-cream presentation.)

how to cook food with your coffee maker

I get many questions about if it’s tricky to clean up after cooking. Answer: Not at all.

Photo: Dan Sörensen.

How to cook Swedish Pitepalt with a coffee maker

Palt (aka pitepalt), or potato dumplings, is apparently a traditional Swedish dish like meatballs, smorgasbord or blood pudding. I didn’t know much about palt, probably because it’s much more common in the very north of Sweden. Since I’m from the far south I never tried it before I made it in my coffee maker.

Taste wise it’s not my favorite traditional Swedish dish, but it definitely serves it’s purpose. It’s is extremely filling. There’s even an expression called “Paltkoma” (= potato dumpling coma) and I’m not surprised  that expression exists.

cooking with your coffee maker

Time

  • About 2 hours

Ingredients

  • 10-15 small potatoes
  • 1 dl barley flour
  • 0.75 dl flour
  • 3 slices of salted pork
  • 0.5 tsp salt
  • Lingonberry jam
  • Salt
  • Butter

Instructions

Peel the potatoes, shred them and mix with salt and flour into a dough. Divide this and form it into 5 balls. Insert salted pork (that you have divided into squares) into center of each ball. Roll them between palms to enclose the pork completely and form smooth balls.

Pour water into the brewer, salt in the can and start your coffee maker. When the water has gone through the system slowly place the palt balls in the can and coffee maker cook for 1,5 hour. Turn off your coffee maker.

Drain and place the palt on a plate. Serve with lingonberry jam and a big dollop of butter!

cooking with your coffee maker

Shred the potatoes. It should be even better shredded than this, but after a misunderstanding it turned out like this.

cooking with your coffee maker

Moisten your hands and you won’t get sticky fingers.

cooking with your coffee maker

Focused…

cooking with your coffee maker

Finally five perfect palt balls!

cooking with your coffee maker

How to cook palt, or potato dumplings, with your coffee maker.

Foto: Dan Sörensen.